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Stress Relief Exercise

We are all feeling stress due to the global pandemic. None more so than Doctors and nurses treating coronavirus patients in

overstretched hospitals. Figures show NHS frontline staff are increasingly suffering from mental health issues. Health chiefs warn staff will be pushed to their limit over the next few weeks of the pandemic. With this in mind I want to share a simple exercise to help reduce anxiety and calm the mind. As part of an acupuncture treatment plan I use particular points with most of my patients, the most common feedback is that they feel less stressed. Less stress has a knock on effect in many areas of our lives, such as better sleep, mood, energy, mental health and relationships, to name a few. A go to point I like to use is Yin Tang.

Yin Tang, or its English translation "Hall of Impressions" is located midway between the ends of the eyebrows. Yin Tang has a very powerful action of calming the mind which makes it a popular point in the treatment of insomnia, anxiety and agitation.


Because of it's location it can be an effective point to treat a frontal headache. Yin Tang also benefits the nose and is often used to treat nasal and sinus congestion, rhinitis and nosebleed.

To get the maximum benefit from this exercise find a quiet space, lie down if you can. Locate the point with your thumb, take a few slow deep breaths to centre yourself. When you're ready take a slow deep breath and exhale while using your thumb to apply pressure in circular movements to the point. As you exhale try to relax your facial muscles. Repeat for a few minutes. It might take a few goes to get the hang of it if you're new to acupressure. Keep trying and you'll feel the benefits of this versatile point.

You can Incorporate this exercise as part of a self care routine. (See my Self Care post from July last year)

If you have friends or family who are NHS workers be sure to let them know about this simple exercise that offers great rewards. It might go someway to help relieving a very stressful day for someone who needs some TLC.


Drawing image from A Manual of Acupunture by Kevin Baker, Mazin Al- Khafaji, and Peter Deadman

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